Safeguarding of Vulnerable Children and Adults Policy

This policy is updated on at least an annual basis with more frequent amendments/additions based on legislative and process changes.

Version Description of amendments to previous version Date of completion Authoriser
1.0 Initial version of policy 22/12/2009 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
1.1 Amendments to policy including guidance on internet usage and cyber-bullying 22/10/2010 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
2.0 Updated guidance including ISA referral guidance, additional examples on 5 R’s, and dedication to train all staff 23/05/2011 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
2.1 Small amendments to text following release of updated Safeguarding training material on LSIS portal 05/12/2011 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
2.2 Changes made to accommodate referrals to Child and Adult Protection Teams for Progress! 09/02/2012 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
2.2.1 Oxfordshire version released with separate case referral instructions 07/03/2012 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
2.2.2 Milton Keynes UA version released with separate case referral instructions 03/08/2012 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
3.0 Refresh of safeguarding policy to include updated detail on ISA and VBS 22/02/2013 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
3.1 Remove reference to ISA completely from policy following disbanding 14/08/2013 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
3.2 Slight amendments to text following review of policy 01/10/2013 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
3.3 Remove reference to CRB from policy; replace with relevant text for DBS 20/12/2013 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
4.0 New version released 09/04/2014 Steven Mitchell –
Head of CI
4.1 Update of job titles of relevant staff 07/01/2015 Steven Mitchell –
Director of CI
4.2 Updated to include sections on PREVENT Duty, Extremism, and Forced Marriage guidelines 08/01/2016 Steven Mitchell –
Director of CI
4.3 Include confirmation that policy is updated on an annual basis 01/11/2016 Steven Mitchell –
Director of CI
4.4 Updated to include new Skills Training UK logo; review of policy to check compliance with new PREVENT and Counter-terrorism updates 02/05/2017 Steven Mitchell –
Director of CI
4.5 General review of policy and processes 07/05/2018 Steven Mitchell –
Director of Research Innovation and Development
4.6 General review of policy and processes 22/03/2019 Steven Mitchell –
Director of Research Innovation and Development
4.7 Annual policy review. Highlighted areas for development within the Prevent Action Plan to be inserted into the overall document 12/02/2020 Steven Mitchell –
Director of Research Innovation and Development
4.8 Annual policy review. Feedback in relation to policy sought form external source. Guidance given to simplify the policy. 16/03/2021 Steven Mitchell –
Director of Research Innovation and Development
4.9 Amended DSG names following MA training 30/07/2021 Steven Mitchell –
Director of Research Innovation and Development

Introduction

The purpose of this procedure is to provide clear guidance to all members of staff who are in regular contact with Learners who may be considered at risk or vulnerable. The term safeguarding describes the broader preventative and precautionary approach to planning and procedures that are necessary to be in place to protect children and young people from any potential harm or damage1.

In all instances where potential abuse of vulnerable adults or children is identified, either within the centre or through external activities, staff should report their observations and information to the Designated Safeguarding Officer for Skills Training UK who is responsible for submitting evidence to the Local Authority through their Designated Officer. This procedure deals with reporting issues where serious safeguarding issues are observed which require action.

Definition of a Child/Vulnerable Adult

Skills Training UK is committed to ensuring that people in settings where we work are adequately safeguarded. People who use our services have a right to train and work in environments free from abuse, neglect, and discrimination.

The definition of who is covered by the Safeguarding Policy is detailed below.

  • Child: up to their 18th birthday (UN convention of the Rights of the Child)
  • Vulnerable Adult: a person who has attained the age of 18, and:
    • Is receiving any form of health care
    • Is receiving a service or participating in an activity which is specifically targeted at people with age-related needs, disabilities or prescribed physical or mental health conditions or expectant or nursing mothers living in residential care
    • Age-related needs include needs associated with frailty, illness, disability, or mental capacity

In reality, the majority of Learners/Participants that Skills Training UK come into contact with through Department of Work (DWP), Skills Funding Agency (SFA) and Education Funding Agency (EFA) contracts will either fit into these categories or be family members of individuals who also fit into these categories.

What are we protecting Children/Vulnerable Adults from?

Skills Training UK is committed to ensuring that children and vulnerable adults are safeguarded against abuse or the threat of abuse. The list below details the different kinds of abuse:

  • Physical abuse – including hitting, slapping, pushing, shaking, kicking, misuse of restraint or inappropriate sanctions. This also includes female genital mutilation (FGM).
  • Sexual abuse – including inappropriate touching, grooming, sexual assault, or acts to which the child or adult did not or could not consent.
  • Psychological abuse – including emotional abuse, threats, deprivation of contact, mocking, humiliation, bullying, harassment, intimidation, coercion, verbal abuse, isolation, deprivation, or withdrawal of services.
  • Neglect or acts of omission – including ignoring medical or physical care needs, withholding of medication or adequate nutrition and failure to provide access to appropriate health, social care, or educational services. This definition has recently been expanded to include inadequate parenting or supervision of children.
  • Financial or material abuse – including unauthorised withdrawal from a vulnerable adults account, theft, fraud (or attempted theft or fraud), exploitation and pressure in connection to wills, property, inheritance, or financial transactions.
  • Discriminatory abuse – including discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, religion, age, and any other protected characteristics covered under the Equality Act 20103
  • Environmental abuse – including safeguarding against accidents, lack of supervision in the workplace or home, and also including housing/homelessness issues which can increase the risk of an unsuitable living environment.
  • Self-abuse – including self-harm, wilful acts of neglect upon oneself, risk of serious injury or suicide.
  • Immigration related problems – including exploitation of individuals due to immigration status, forced marriage.
  •  Radicalisation – including exploitation of individuals to become involved in or to carry out an act of terrorism.

It is important to be aware that forms of abuse are often combined; for example, discrimination and bullying can often lead to self-abuse and harming and therefore it is important that

E-Safety

In recognition of the increased use of IT to communicate between Learners and members of staff, Skills Training UK has updated its IT User Policy to include specific guidelines on the acceptable use of IT within classrooms and outside of work. While recognising the importance of social networking and email in communications both from a work and social aspect it is important to ensure that these do not result in abuse towards either Learners or members of staff.

Cyber-bullying, grooming and online radicalisation will be managed through monitoring of all internet and email traffic across Skills Training UK servers; any activity that could be reasonably construed as abuse towards another Learner, group of Learners, or to members of Skills Training UK staff will be considered in the same way as the different types of abuse defined in the previous page.

The use of distribution of images, text/information, or videos will also be carefully scrutinised and monitored by Tutors, Trainer Assessors, and all education providers for Skills Training UK. Learners are made aware of their responsibilities during induction and an IT Acceptable Use poster is available in all classrooms where IT facilities are available which outlines clearly what is deemed acceptable and unacceptable practice.

Sexting

Making, possessing, and distributing any imagery of someone under 18 which is ‘indecent’ is illegal. Young people who share sexual imagery of themselves, or peers, are breaking the law. All incidents involving youth produced sexual imagery should be responded to in line with this policy.

If a young person has shared imagery consensually, such as when in a romantic relationship, or as a joke, and there is no intended malice, it is appropriate to manage the incident directly. This would be through a one-to-one mentoring and a relevant personal social development session delivered to the class. In contrast any incidents with aggravating factors, for example, a young person sharing someone else’s imagery without consent and with malicious intent, should generally be referred to police and/or children’s social care.

Designated Safeguarding Officer would normally decide to make an immediate referral to police and/or children’s social care should be made if at this initial stage:

  1. The incident involves an adult
  2. There is reason to believe that a young person has been coerced, blackmailed, or groomed, or if there are concerns about their capacity to consent (for example owing to special educational needs)
  3. What you know about the imagery suggests the content depicts sexual acts which are unusual for the young person’s developmental stage, or are violent
  4. The imagery involves sexual acts and any person in the imagery is under 13.
  5. You have reason to believe a learner is at immediate risk of harm owing to the sharing of the imagery, for example, the young person is presenting as suicidal or self-harming

The use of distribution of images, text/information, or videos will also be carefully scrutinised and monitored by Tutors, Trainer Assessors, and all education providers for Skills Training UK. Learners are made aware of their responsibilities during induction and an IT Acceptable Use poster is available in all classrooms where IT facilities are available which outlines clearly what is deemed acceptable and unacceptable practice. The Acceptable Use of IT agreement is automatically displayed on log in to all Skills Training UK machines. Learners are required to agree and adhere to this policy in order to be able to use the computer facilities. Learners are provided with access to the IT Usage Policy via the Learner Portal

What should you do if you identify suspected abuse?

Safeguarding is a company-wide responsibility for all staff working for Skills Training UK. We all have a duty of care to ensure that safety and well-being of children and vulnerable adults who attend programmes run by our organisation. This in turn means that we as an organisation must be vigilant in identifying potential abuse and  prevent its continuation. There are 5 areas of responsibility of everyone working with children, young people, and adults at risk: Recognise, Respond, Record, Report and Refer.

Recognising Abuse

The ability to recognise abuse is the first responsibility of everyone working with children and vulnerable adults. This refers to how we recognise potential signs of abuse or how it could be made apparent to you, i.e., through a disclosure, allegation, your concerns about a child or vulnerable adult, or through whistleblowing (concerns about another adult’s practice).

Recognising abuse can be difficult, and all Skills Training UK staff receive safeguarding training4 on an annual basis to ensure there is a basic understanding of the main signs of abuse; most recently on the PREVENT Duty. The threshold which constitutes abuse is that the victim is suffering from or at risk of ‘significant harm’ with continued exposure to their environment. Some of the signs and symptoms might not be indicative of abuse but of a young person in adolescence or the nature of their disability. What is important to look out for is behaviour that is uncharacteristic of that Participant, as well as explanations which do not seem consistent with the signs you are seeing.

Where there are concerns about the behaviour of a colleague, please refer to the Whistle-blowing policy within the Skills Training UK HR Handbook for more details.

If there is any suspicion of abuse, this should be reported as soon as convenient to the Designated Safeguarding Officer for Skills Training UK. They will immediately coordinate with the appropriate authorit(ies) to identify what the most suitable response is to the abuse, and to give further advice as to what to do. Unless advised otherwise, you should continue to maintain appointments as scheduled, and should not take any proactive actions to draw information from potential abusers or abused without further guidance.

Responding to Abuse

How the member of staff responds is critical to the nature of any investigation arising from the suspected act of abuse. Disclosure of abuse itself can take many forms: through observation of an act of abuse, through an open discussion where the victim describes situations or events that could be construed as abuse, or even through the abuser themselves in their discussions with you.

Where information is being disclosed to you, it is important to allow the person disclosing potential issues the opportunity to say as much or as little as they wish, clarifying but not asking leading questions, or delving too deeply into the reasons for abuse or inappropriate actions. Where the disclosure is made by the person receiving abuse, it is important to clarify that what will happen next: it is important that you make clear that the information will be reported back to the Designated Safeguarding Officer who will pass on information to the Local Authority, and therefore there may be subsequent interviews to gather further evidence.

Record

Where a disclosure is made, a record should be made of all events witnessed by the member of staff. It is important to do this as soon as possible, though consideration should be taken as to whether recording information can take place in the environment where the abuse is potentially taking place. Where taking a disclosure from a Participant, it is important to capture as much as you can in the words, they have used rather than interpretation. No matter what the nature of the abuse is and how severe its actions, it is important that any descriptions used, and information gathered reflect the situation objectively: emotive, or overly descriptive language could jeopardise any investigation into findings and may create confusion from the potential victim into what was and was not said at the time of disclosure.

The referring member of staff (Tutor/Trainer Assessor or education provider) should complete a Notice of Concern form in as much detail as possible (provided separately). While the form can be completed with the Learner present, this may create anxiety and therefore it is recommended that while this is used to record the details of a safeguarding event that any discussion with the Learner is held separately and that corresponding notes are attached.

Report

All suspected instances of abuse and safeguarding risk should be reported to the Designated Safeguarding Officer for Skills Training UK. It will be their responsibility to raise the issue immediately with the Local Authority, and to coordinate the next steps to be taken.

Once a disclosure has been reported, the member of staff should maintain any agreed schedule of contact; however, no further action or discussion should take place with regard to any disclosure made. If the person making the disclosure requests any update through the member of staff, it should be made clear that the matter has been raised to the appropriate Local Authority (where applicable) and that the matter is now in their hands. The person can speak to the Designated Safeguarding Officer at any point should they wish to discuss the disclosure further or where there is any additional information they wish to disclose.

Referral

Where it is deemed that further investigation is required into the allegation, Skills Training UK will work with the appropriate authority to undertake a full review of activity and determine the most appropriate action. Skills Training UK will inform as a minimum (and depending on the case)

  • Local Authority (through Child/Adult Social Care Teams)
  • Police (examples below)
    • The Forced Marriage Unit
    • Channel referral (for counterterrorism only)
  • Parent/Guardian (where appropriate and not linked to the abuse)
  • Employer (where appropriate)

The role of the Local Authority

The Designated Officer or a team of officers5 (previously LADO) is a local authority role which is in place to ensure that allegations against people working with children are progressed in a timely and appropriate way. The role covers all settings where people work with children (e.g., Football Clubs, Church Groups, Child Minders, and Youth centres).

The Local Authority should be made aware of all cases in which it is alleged that a person who has responsibility and/or works with children has:

  • Behaved in a way that has harmed a child, or may have harmed a child or
    vulnerable adult
  • Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child or vulnerable
    adult
  • Behaved towards a child or vulnerable adult in a way that indicates s/he is
    unsuitable to work or be responsible with their welfare.

Investigation is likely to involve a multi-agency approach which may include (though not limited to): social services, housing, primary care trust, National Offenders Management Service, Department for Education, Skills Funding Agency, and Jobcentre Plus. Please note that a disclosure can implicate more than one strand of investigation and therefore STUK DSO will make referral across parties where
applicable.

Cases will be measured and investigated according to the requirements of the case. Where a child (under 18) is involved, the case should always be referred to the Child Social Care or suitable equivalent team in the Local Authority. Where the disclosure pertains to a vulnerable adult, this will ordinarily be managed by the Adult Social Care team. Where the allegation involves a member of staff, be that Skills Training
UK or a member of Local Authority staff this should be raised immediately to the Local Authority Designated Officer. Skills Training UK will also formally investigate any allegations made against a member of staff as detailed in the section below on Safer Recruitment.

There may be up to three main strands in the consideration of an allegation.

  • Consideration by an employer of disciplinary action in respect of the individual if this applies. Where an allegation is made against a member of Skills Training UK staff this will automatically involve removal of the individual who will be either moved onto other duties which do not allow contact with any vulnerable adults or children, or suspension from work depending on the nature and severity of the allegation(s)
  • Enquiries and assessment by children’s or adult social care about whether a child/vulnerable adult needs protection or in need of services; these will be followed up through the Designated Safeguarding Officer
  • A police investigation of a possible criminal offence

Cases will be measured and investigated according to the requirements of the case. Where a child (under 18) is involved, the case should always be referred to the Child Social Care or suitable equivalent team in the Local Authority. Where the disclosure pertains to an adult at risk, this will ordinarily be managed by the Adult Social Care team. Where the allegation involves a member of staff, be that Skills Training UK or a member of Local Authority staff this should be raised immediately to the Local Authority Designated Officer. Skills Training UK will also formally investigate any allegations made against a member of staff as detailed in the section below on Safer Recruitment.

There may be up to three main strands in the consideration of an allegation.

  • Consideration by an employer of disciplinary action in respect of the individual if this applies. Where an allegation is made against a member of Skills Training UK staff this will automatically involve removal of the individual who will be either moved onto other duties which do not allow contact with any adults at risk or children, or suspension from work depending on the nature and severity of the allegation(s)
  • Enquiries and assessment by children’s or adult social care about whether a child/ adult at risk needs protection or in need of services; these will be followed up through the Designated Safeguarding Officer
  • A police investigation of a possible criminal offence

Safeguarding Contacts:

All frontline staff must liaise with their Designated Safeguarding Officer with regards to safeguarding cases:

  • For learners on Study and Traineeship programmes, your appointed Designated Safeguarding Officer is Joanne Heywood – M: 07792 785531
  • For learners on Apprenticeship programmes, your appointed Designated Safeguarding Officer is Lisa Kilgallon – M: 07540703383
  • In the event that neither are available, please contact our support Designated Safeguarding Officer, Anthony Melia – M: 07799424590
  • In the event that none of the above are available or on leave, please contact Designated Safeguarding Officer, Michelle Allen – M: 07584381199
  • Steven Mitchell (Director of Research, Innovation and Development at Skills Training UK remains Skills Training’s Designated Safeguarding Lead and can be contacted via M: 07860 695386

All Notice of Concern forms should be sent to the safeguarding@skillstraininguk.com email address

Extremism

Government Prevent strategy defines extremism as ‘vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs.’

The definition also includes calls for the death of members of British armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.

Preventing Radicalisation

Skills Training UK recognises that there is no one way of identifying individuals likely to be drawn by extremist ideologies. As with other safeguarding risks, staff must be vigilant and responsive to changes in learners’ behaviour and address any issues as per steps outlined in the sections above.

Why might a young person be drawn towards extremist ideology?

A decision by a young person to become involved in violent extremism may be driven by:

  • search for answers to questions about identity, faith and belonging
  • desire for ‘adventure’ and excitement
  • desire to enhance the self-esteem of the individual and promote their ‘street cred’
  • identification with a charismatic individual and attraction to a group which can offer identity, social network, and support
  • sense of grievance that can be triggered by personal experiences of racism or discrimination.

As part of company’s strategy to build learners’ resilience to radicalisation, Skills Training UK training centres must provide safe environment for open discussion while promoting mainstream Fundamental British Values: ‘democracy, rule of law, equality of opportunity, freedom of speech and the rights of all men and women to live free from persecution of any kind’.

Learners are involved in Learner Focus Groups during which they can voice their opinions and perform a vital role in decision-making process. Curriculum ensures that learners not only gain subject knowledge but also experience spiritual, moral, social, and cultural development. Staff are expected to support learners in building their self-confidence and stimulate their critical thinking skills.

Apart from general vigilance described in the earlier sections of this policy, staff should be wary of early indicators of radicalisation which may include:

  • Showing sympathy for extremist causes
  • Glorifying violence
  • Evidence of possessing illegal or extremist literature
  • Advocating messages similar to illegal organisations such as “National Action” or “Muslims Against Crusades” or other non-proscribed extremist groups.
  • Out of character changes in appearance, behaviour, and peer relationships
  • Secretive behaviour
  • Anxiety

POL0009 Safeguarding of Vulnerable Children & Adults Policy V4.9 20210730
• Glorifying violence
• Evidence of possessing illegal or extremist literature
• Advocating messages similar to illegal organisations such as “National Action” or “Muslims Against Crusades” or other non-proscribed extremist groups.
• Out of character changes in appearance, behaviour, and peer relationships
• Secretive behaviour
• Anxiety

External Speakers

Skills Training UK has a duty to ensure that all external speakers are appropriately screened and vetted before being allowed to the premises. Prior to the event, the organiser must gather all necessary information about the speaker, including any training materials, and submit them to the Designated Safeguarding Officer via safeguarding@skillstraininguk.com for approval using the External Speaker Checklist/Approval Form which forms part of the Trip Activity and Risk Assessment document. All external visitors must be issued visitor badges and be accompanied by a member of staff at all times.

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

FGM is illegal in the UK. It is a practice that takes place worldwide in at least 28 African countries and in parts of the Middle and Far East. It also takes place within parts of Western Europe and other developed countries, primarily among immigrant and refugee communities. UK communities that are at risk of FGM include Somali, Kenyan, Ethiopian, Sierra Leonean, Sudanese, Egyptian, Nigerian, Eritrean, Yemeni, Kurdish and Indonesian women and girls.

FGM is believed to be a way of ensuring virginity and chastity. It is used to safeguard girls from sex outside marriage and from having sexual feelings. Although FGM is practised by secular communities, it is most often claimed to be carried out in accordance with religious beliefs. FGM is not supported by any religious doctrine.

Legal Duty

All education establishments have a duty to report concerns about girls at risk of FGM to the police and social services.10

FGM has been a criminal offence in the UK since 1985. In 2003 it also became a criminal offence for UK nationals or permanent UK residents to take their child abroad to have female genital mutilation.

Anyone found guilty of the offence faces a maximum penalty of 14 years in prison.

Risk Factors

A learner at immediate risk of FGM may not know what’s going to happen. But she might talk about, or you may become aware of:
A long holiday abroad or going ‘home’ to visit family
Relative or cutter visiting from abroad
A special occasion or ceremony to ‘become a woman’ or get ready for marriage
A female relative being cut – a sister, cousin, or an older female relative such as a mother or aunt.

Indicators FGM may have taken place

A girl or woman who’s had female genital mutilation (FGM) may:

  • have difficulty walking, standing, or sitting
  • spend longer in the bathroom or toilet
  • appear withdrawn, anxious, or depressed
  • have unusual behaviour after an absence from school or college
  • be particularly reluctant to undergo normal medical examinations
  • ask for help, but may not be explicit about the problem due to embarrassment or fear

County Lines

County lines is a major, cross-cutting issue involving drugs, violence, gangs, safeguarding, criminal and sexual exploitation, modern slavery, and missing persons; and the response to tackle it involves the police, the National Crime Agency, a wide range of Government departments, local government agencies and VCS (voluntary and community sector) organisations.

The UK Government defines county lines as: County lines is a term used to describe gangs and organised criminal networks involved in exporting illegal drugs into one or more importing areas within the UK, using dedicated mobile phone lines or other form of “deal line”.

They are likely to exploit children and vulnerable adults to move and store the drugs and money and they will often use coercion, intimidation, violence (including sexual violence) and weapons.

County lines activity and the associated violence, drug dealing, and exploitation has a devastating impact on young people, vulnerable adults, and local communities.

In the event that you believe that a learner may be a potential victim of such exploitation, you should complete a Notice for Concern form and contact your Designated Safeguarding Officer. You should include any information you may have obtained relating to the regions and individuals involved in your referral to enable liaison between safeguarding agencies in the different areas.

Further information on safeguarding can be found in the Department for Education’s Working Together to Safeguard Children Guidance.11

If you are worried that a vulnerable person is at immediate risk of harm you should also contact the police or your Designated Safeguarding Officer immediately.
Further reading: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/working-together-to-safeguard-children–2

Learners’ Knowledge

Skills Training UK is committed to teaching about safeguarding issues in the classroom to prevent harm by providing young people with skills, attributes, and knowledge to help them navigate risks.

Learners will receive information on key issues related to Safeguarding, Health and Safety and Equality and Diversity during the induction process and will be given a handy safeguarding card prompting them to report any concerns to a member of staff or the safeguarding team. As part of Personal Social Development curriculum, Skills Training UK will provide young people with opportunities to learn about topics such as Health Relationships, Prevent and Radicalisation, Sexual Health and Drug / Alcohol Dependencies. Learners complete Prevent and British values booklets while on the course and complete relevant training session. These are conducted via one to one mentoring, direct group delivery or via external agencies / speakers.

All centres have Centre Policies folders easily available for learners as well as the important policies displayed on the notice boards. Each centre has a Safer Learning poster displayed in a prominent place including the contact details for the Designated Safeguarding Officer.

Safer Recruitment and Skills Training UK internal policy

Skills Training UK is committed to a policy in which:

  • All staff before commencement of duties will be expected to be checked in line with Her Majesty’s Baseline Personnel Security Standards (HMGBPSS) which will include a 3-year checked work history and enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. Where staff are required to have contact with children or adults at risk, Skills Training UK will only recruit or appoint staff who are deemed suitable to work with children or adults at risk
  • Existing members of staff moving into roles that have a direct contact with learners will undergo an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)
  • All staff working with children and adults at risk will be issued with a copy of this policy. Any member of staff found in breach of the guidance will be subject to disciplinary procedures in accordance with the Skills Training UK Code of Practice. Any offence will be automatically reported to the Local Authority
  • All frontline staff will be expected to undergo refresher training on an annual basis. This will be through the Foundation Online Learning portal in the first instance with the Safeguarding in the FE 2019 training course.
  • All management staff whose responsibilities include recruitment will be expected to complete Safeguarding and Safer Recruitment in the FE 2019.
  • All frontline staff will also undergo PREVENT duty training which will be undertaken by the relevant police force; this is to protect learners at risk of radicalisation and extremism. In addition, staff will be provided with regular refresher training using an online Channel- General Awareness training.

Links to e-learning are at listed at the end of the document

Good Practice for all staff

  •  Always work in an open environment avoiding private or unobserved situations, encourage open communication among Learners;
  • Treat all children and adults at risk equally with respect and dignity;
  • Maintain a safe and appropriate distance;
  • Be aware of the effect your words or actions may have.

Practices to be avoided by all staff

  • Spending excessive amounts of time alone with children and adults at risk away from others
  • Straying from the specified task or assignment
  • Being unnecessarily inquisitive regarding activities that Learners have been undertaking (unless there is a genuine concern from the staff member that the activity could be harmful to the Learner or to others)
  • Saying anything that may make a child or adult at risk feel uncomfortable, or that could be interpreted as aggressive, hostile, or impatient
  • Being drawn into personal conversations between Learners
  • Sitting or standing too close
  • Meeting other than at the prearranged venue
  • Exchanging personal details
  • Making contact via social internet contact sites – for example Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp

Unacceptable practices

  • Allow allegations made by a child or adult at risk to go unchallenged, unrecorded, or not acted upon;
  • Fail to report on any witnessed or suspected unacceptable practices by other members of staff;
  • Promise a child or adult at risk that their confidences will be kept secret;
  • Allow children or adults at risk to use inappropriate language unchallenged;
  • Reduce a child or adult at risk to tears as a form of control;
  • Allow or engage in any form of touching or make suggestive comments to a child or adult at risk;
  • Keeping learner personal information or information related to the safeguarding cases on personal phones or other machines.

Skills Training UK will undertake investigation and ultimately potential disciplinary procedures with relation to any unacceptable practices by staff.

Skills Training UK have a duty to refer any employee to both the Local Authority Designated Officer (as detailed above) and other appropriate authorities where the employee has undertaken any activity

  • That endangers a child or adult at risk, or is likely to endanger a child or adult at risk
  • If repeated against or in relation to a child or adult at risk, would endanger them or would be likely to endanger them
  • That involves sexual material relating to children (including possession of such material)
  • That involves sexually explicit images depicting violence against human beings (including possession of such images)
  • Is of a sexual nature involving a child or adult at risk
  • Is considered grooming or preparing a child or adult at risk towards an activity or action which could be construed as an act of terrorism.

All activities described above will also be considered as gross misconduct in accordance with Skills Training UK company policy and code of practice for staff; this will lead to automatic suspension of duties while a full investigation is carried out and summary dismissal should the investigation identify any shortcomings in the employees conduct.

Web links to relevant e-learning

Mandatory Training for all staff

Safeguarding and Safer Recruitment Foundation Online
Channel – General Awareness training Channel
PREVENT Foundation Online 2
Advancing Equality and Diversity Foundation Online 3
Awareness of Forced Marriage HSCVOOC
Female Genital Mutilation – Recognising and Preventing FGM FGM Learning

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